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Significant Changes Proposed to Ontario’s Workplace Laws

Ontario’s government introduced workplace legislation on July 16, 2014 that would affect five labour and employment statutes in the province. Significant changes that are proposed in the Stronger Workplaces for a Stronger Economy Act, 2014 include:

  • Eliminating the $10,000 cap on the recovery of unpaid wages by employees through the Ministry of Labour claim process under the Employment Standards Act, 2000;
  • Increasing the limitation period to two years for employees to recover unpaid wages through the Ministry of Labour claim process under the Employment Standards Act, 2000.  The current limitation period is six months or one year depending on the type of claim;
  • Requiring employers to provide each of their employees with a copy of the most recent poster published by the Ministry of Labour that provides information about the Employment Standards Act, 2000. An employer must provide available translations of the poster if requested by an employee;
  • Making temporary help agencies and their clients jointly and severally liable for unpaid regular wages and unpaid overtime pay;
  • Requiring the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board to assign workplace injury and accident costs to temporary help agency clients when an employee is injured while performing work for the agency’s client;
  • Extending the safety protections under the Occupational Health and Safety Act to unpaid workers receiving training under prescribed conditions;
  • Decreasing the construction industry’s open period, when construction workers can join a different union close to the end of the term of their collective agreement, from three months to two months;
  • Expanding employment protections for foreign nationals who are in Ontario under an immigration or foreign temporary employee program. The protections include a prohibition on charging a recruiter fee or taking possession of the foreign national’s property, such as their passport or work permit; and
  • Tying future minimum wage increases under the Employment Standards Act, 2000 to the Consumer Price Index. The new minimum wage will be announced by April 1 of each year and will come into effect on October 1.

It is currently unclear when the proposed changes will be passed by the Ontario legislature. We will keep you apprised of any developments.

A copy of the Stronger Workplaces for a Stronger Economy Act, 2014 can be found here: http://www.ontla.on.ca/bills/bills-files/41_Parliament/Session1/b018.pdf

Significant Changes Proposed to Ontario’s Workplace Laws

Yet Another Reminder on the Importance of Careful Drafting of Termination Clauses…

As if employers needed one, we now have yet another decision invalidating a termination provision for failure to comply with the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (the “ESA”)Miller v. A.B.M. Canada Inc., 2014 ONSC 4062 (CanLII).

Mr. Miller applied for and obtained the position of “Director, Finance and Business Process Improvement”.  Prior to commencing employment, he had signed an employment contract, which contained the following elements of “remuneration”:

  • A base salary of $135,000 per year;
  • Pension contributions up to a maximum of 6% of base salary; and
  • A car allowance of $680 per month.

The employment contract contained the following provision in respect of termination without cause:

“Regular employees may be terminated at any time without cause upon being given the minimum period of notice prescribed by applicable legislation, or by being paid salary in lieu of such notice or as may otherwise be required by applicable legislation.”

 Mr. Miller commenced employment on September 1, 2009 and was dismissed on a without cause basis on January 26, 2011. The primary issue was whether the termination provision limited Mr. Miller’s entitlement to the ESA minimum (two weeks), or whether he was entitled to common law pay in lieu of notice.

After examining the clause and considering case law (including Wright v. Young and Rubicam Group of Companies and Stevens v. Sifton Properties Ltd.), the Court came to the following conclusions:

  • the length of the notice period in the contract, being “the minimum period of notice prescribed by applicable legislation”, was effective to rebut the presumption of reasonable notice according to common law, and as such (provided the remainder of the contract was valid), the amount of notice was legitimately established in the contract as being the ESA minimum; but                                     
  • the contract breached the ESA requirement that if pay in lieu of notice is provided, all benefits must be continued.  The contract only required the payment of “salary” in lieu of notice. The failure of the contract to require payment of the 6% pension contribution and the car allowance rendered the clause contrary to the ESA, and void for all purposes, such that Mr. Miller was entitled to common law pay in lieu of notice.

The Court also made the observation (although technically this was not a required part of the decision and would be considered obiter), that the wording of the provision at issue will determine whether it is enforceable, rather than the actual actions of the parties.  In other words, if a provision is unenforceable because it does not comply with the ESA in some respect, the fact that the employer does actually comply with the ESA will not render the provision at issue enforceable.

Interestingly, the Court held that although the termination provision was invalid, Mr. Miller “cannot escape bearing some responsibility for the fact that both parties entered into a contract which fell below ESA standards”, which seems to suggest that the Court still considered the contract when assessing the common law notice period. Ultimately, after considering Mr. Miller’s age (39), length of service (17 months) and position (Director, Finance and Business Process Improvement), the Court awarded three months of pay in lieu of notice at common law.

Mr. Miller thus received three months of pay in lieu of notice, rather than the minimum two weeks pursuant to the ESA.  This case stands as yet another reminder that termination provisions must be carefully drafted to meet the ESA in every respect, or they will be subject to attack, resulting in the employee potentially being entitled to common law pay in lieu of notice.

Miller v. A.B.M. Canada Inc., 2014 ONSC 4062 (CanLII)

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Yet Another Reminder on the Importance of Careful Drafting of Termination Clauses…

Join us May 1st for Dentons’ Spring Employment and Labour Law Update

Please join us on May 1st for a complimentary seminar /webinar on the following topics:

July 1st Deadline Looming: How to Comply with Ontario’s New Safety Awareness Training Regulation
Adrian Miedema

Internal Fraud — Managing Termination and Asset Recovery Options
Mark Evans and Blair McCreadie

An Update on Ontario’s Workplace Violence and Workplace Harassment Law
Saba Zia

CHRP Accreditation
This program may be eligible for recertification points.

CPD Accreditation
This 1.5 hour program can be applied toward 9 of the 12 educational hours for Continuing Professional Development required annually by the Law Society of Upper Canada. Please note that these CPD hours are not accredited for the Professionalism Requirement.

Event Details

May 1, 2014
Registration & Breakfast
8:00 – 8:30 a.m. EDT
Seminar
8:30 – 10:00 a.m. EDT

Dentons Canada LLP, 77 King St West, North Building, 5th Floor, Toronto

Or by webinar

To RSVP:

RSVP to Carla Vasquez, Specialist, Marketing and Events at carla.vasquez@dentons.com.

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Join us May 1st for Dentons’ Spring Employment and Labour Law Update

Benefits for Employees over Age 65

As of December 2006, the Ontario Human Rights Code was amended to abolish mandatory retirement. However, the provincial government intentionally did not make corresponding revisions to the Employment Standards Act or the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act. As a result, the law prohibits employer-initiated termination of employment because an employee has reached the age of 65. Voluntary retirement remains acceptable and common. However, employees who work past age 65 are not covered for work-related injuries and need not be covered by group benefit plans. The maximum period for which loss of earnings benefits will be paid under the workers’ compensation system is two years after the date of injury if the employee was age 63 or older on the date of injury. While some employers have arranged for benefit plans to cover employees over age 65, given the increased premium costs, this can lead to a decrease in benefit coverage for all employees or other types of trade-offs. In addition, some unionized employers have been required to provide group health benefits to employees over age 65 due to the wording of a collective agreement – typically a benefits clause which describes the benefits for all members of the bargaining unit.

It was foreseeable that this hybrid status of a worker over age 65 – legally protected from mandatory retirement but not legally protected to receive continued benefits – would lead to litigation. Such an employee would face difficulty succeeding with a complaint under the Employment Standards Act, Human Rights Code or Workplace Safety and Insurance Act since these provincial laws all permit this differentiation.

The Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario (HRTO) is currently hearing such a case. The employee is a unionized teacher who is representing himself. His union cannot bring forward a grievance because it has reached an agreement with the school board in exchange for lump sum payments to teachers over age 65. Nor is the union appearing at the HRTO proceedings. So far, there have been a number of Interim Decisions and Case Assessment Directions issued in the case and the teacher has been unsuccessful in alleging unlawful age discrimination. The final argument, which continues to proceed through the HRTO process, is whether the Human Rights Code of Ontario contravenes the equality rights provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, a significant legal challenge for a lone, unrepresented employee.

We will be following this important case as it continues to unfold.

Talos v. Grand Erie District School Board, 2013 HRTO 1949; 2014 HRTO 529

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Benefits for Employees over Age 65

Upcoming Ontario Ministry of Labour blitzes

Ontario’s Ministry of Labour has announced several upcoming blitzes during which it will ensure that employers in specified industries are compliant with particular areas of concern under the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (“ESA”).  Both provincial and regional blitzes have been announced.

A recent posting on this blog dealt with the issue of unpaid internships, in follow-up to the announcement by Toronto Life magazine and The Walrus magazine that they were ending their unpaid internships following recent government inspections.  Those inspections were part of the announced blitz with a focus on interns, which began in April and will continue until June in the areas of marketing/public relations, software development, retail, media, film and entertainment industries.

Also on the horizon is a provincial blitz to focus on vulnerable and temporary foreign workers which has been announced for the period from September to November 2014 in the following industries: restaurants, building services, personal care services, business support services and agriculture. 

Finally, that will be followed in early 2015 with a provinncial blitz on temporary help agencies, in order to ensure that they are compliant with the laws relating to temporary help workers.

On a regional level, Simcoe, Peel, Dufferin & York veterinary clinics and security service firms will undergo a general ESA blitz in June and July of 2014.  At the same time, Toronto and Durham region car dealerships and supermarkets will also undergo a general ESA blitz.  Ottawa, Kingston, Peterborough, Hamilton, Kitchener/Waterloo, London and Windsor seasonal businesses and tourism-related businesses will see their own general ESA blitz from June through August and finally, professional offices in Northern Ontario will see a similar blitz in June and July.

It is always good to have your house in order; however, for companies which may be targeted by one of the blitzes noted above, it is of particular importance that your business be compliant with the ESA.

For more information, the Ministry’s announcement can be found at the following link:  https://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/resources/blitzschedule.php.

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Upcoming Ontario Ministry of Labour blitzes

Beware the Unpaid Intern – He/She May be Eligible for Pay

The issue of unpaid internships is becoming a growing concern for both employers and Ministry of Labour Inspectors. Recently, the publisher of magazines Toronto Life and The Walrus announced that they were pulling the plug on their unpaid internships following a Ministry of Labour inspection (http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/unpaid-internships-at-toronto-life-the-walrus-shut-down-by-ontario-1.2589115). Rogers has subsequently followed suit, with a company spokesperson announcing that the company wants all internships to be associated with an educational institution or to be paid (http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2014/04/03/unpaid_interns_dropped_from_rogersowned_magazines.html).

Provincial employment standards legislation in Canada generally requires that all “employees” receive minimum wage and that the employer meets other minimum standards. The legislation does, however, recognize that there is a benefit to allowing unpaid internships, while at the same time ensuring that certain requirements are met in order to prevent an employer from characterizing vulnerable workers as “interns” to avoid the obligation to provide the minimum standards.

The employment standards requirements for retaining unpaid interns vary significantly across Canada. This blog will examine the requirements in Ontario and Québec.

Ontario Requirements

Internships in the School Context

An individual can work and not be subject to the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (the “ESA”) in either of the following circumstances:

  • he/she is a secondary school student who performs work under a work experience program authorized by the school board that operates the school in which the student is enrolled; or
  • he/she performs work pursuant to a program approved by a college of applied arts and technology or a university.

If either of these exemptions applies, the individual can be retained without the organization meeting the requirements of the ESA.

Internships Outside of the School Context

If the internship program is not affiliated with a college of applied arts and technology or a university, an individual receiving training in skills similar to those used by the organization’s employees is an “employee” and is entitled to the minimum requirements of the ESA (including minimum wage), unless all of the following conditions are met:

  • The training is similar to that which is given in a vocational school;
  • The training is for the benefit of the individual;
  • The organization providing the training derives little, if any, benefit from the activity of the individual while he or she is being trained;
  • The individual does not displace employees of the organization providing the training;
  • The individual is not accorded a right to become an employee of the organization providing the training; and
  • The individual is advised that he or she will receive no remuneration for the time that he or she spends in training.

Only if all of these requirements are met is the person exempt from the ESA. If even one of these conditions is not satisfied, the individual would be entitled to the minimum standards of the ESA.

Québec Requirements

Internships in the School Context

Section 3(5) of Québec’s Act respecting Labour Standards (the “ALS”) provides that the ALS does not apply to a student who works during the school year in an establishment selected by an educational institution pursuant to a job induction program approved by the Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (the Ministry of Education). The fact that the ALS does not apply to such students implies that an employer may not be required to pay them.

However, each of the conditions mentioned in this provision must be present in order for the exception to apply. To be excluded from the application of the ALS, the individual must meet all of the following four conditions, namely:

  • be a student;
  • who works during the school year;
  • in an establishment chosen by an educational institution;
  • pursuant to a job induction program approved by the Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport.

Internships Outside of the School Context

In Québec, whenever an “internship” takes place outside of the school/student context such that the above exception is not applicable, the Regulation adopted under the Act respecting Labour Standards (“RLS”) provides that the minimum wage requirement does not exist for “trainees” or “students” such as:

  • a student employed in a non-profit organization having social or community purposes, such as a vacation camp or a recreational organization;
  • a trainee under a program of vocational training recognized by law (this law must provide for the nature and duration of the vocational training, i.e. internship in a law firm after Bar school); or
  • a trainee under a program of vocational integration under section 61 of the Act to secure the handicapped in the exercise of their rights.

The mere fact that trainees fall within any of the three above exceptions does not mean that they should not be paid at all during the internship, but rather means that the employer is not bound by the minimum wage rate requirement. However, where an employer chooses not to pay such trainees at all, the trainees do not have recourse pursuant to the ALS.

Whether in Ontario, Québec or elsewhere in Canada, we recommend that if an employer is contemplating retaining unpaid interns, legal advice be sought to ensure that the program meets the applicable provincial criteria. In addition, there should always be written documentation (such as an offer letter) making clear that the position is unpaid because the person is a student, trainee or an intern, to avoid later disputes that the individual did not understand the nature of the opportunity or the fact that he/she would not be paid.

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Beware the Unpaid Intern – He/She May be Eligible for Pay

(Not) April Fools Day – Changes to the Canada Labour Code effective April 1, 2014

For those federally regulated employers that are governed by the Canada Labour Code (the “Federal Code”), there are some substantive changes coming of which you should take note.

The Jobs and Growth Act, 2012 made certain amendments to the Federal Code. The amendments stem primarily from the public consultations that followed the Report of the Federal Labour Standards Review Commission that was released in 2006. The Government has indicated that the amendments are designed generally to make compliance with the Federal Code easier for employers and employees, and to reduce the employers’ costs of administering the legislation.

It has now been announced that the changes will come into force on April 1, 2014.

Limitation Period for Recovery of Wages

Currently there is no established time limit beyond which wages under Part III (labour standards) cannot be recovered. As a result, inspectors can issue written payment orders to employers or directors, ordering them to pay to the employee any wages or other amounts owing to which an employee is entitled going back as far as the evidence establishes that an amount is owing, potentially years prior.

The amendment will set a six-month time limit for the filing of a complaint alleging unpaid wages. As such, if an inspector concludes that an employer has paid to an employee all wages and other amounts under Part III for the six-month period preceding the complaint, the inspector will issue a notice of unfounded complaint. If an amount is found to be owing within this period, the inspector may make an order for wages and other amounts owing for a period starting 12 months (or 24 months for vacation pay) before the date on which the complaint is made, the date on which employment was terminated, or the date on which the inspection started (where a payment order results from a proactive inspection).

For employers, this means that an inspector will not be able to reach back indefinitely in reviewing an employee’s complaint for wages, and brings the Federal Code in line with most provincial statutes in setting a reasonable limit on the inspector’s power to issue orders.

Establishment of a 30-Day Time Period to Pay Vacation Pay on Termination of Employment

The Federal Code currently requires employers to pay outstanding vacation pay “forthwith” to employees when they cease to be employed. As vacation pay is considered wages under the Federal Code, this creates an anomaly, because the Federal Code generally requires employers to pay any wages “within 30 days” from the time when the entitlement to the wages arose. The amendment will ensure that employers pay employees any vacation pay owed within 30 days (rather than “forthwith”) after the day on which the employment ends.

Administrative Review Mechanism for Payment Orders and Notices of Unfounded Complaint

The amendments provide for an administrative review mechanism. Within 15 days of a payment order, the rejection of an unjust dismissal complaint or a notice of unfounded complaint, a person affected by an inspector’s decision can request a review of the decision, with written reasons. An employer or corporate director requesting a review would have to pay the Minister the amount indicated in the payment order as a condition of the review. A payment order or a notice of unfounded complaint could be confirmed, amended or rescinded on review. The decision on review could be further appealed to a referee, but only on a question of law or jurisdiction. The Minister could also refer a complex case directly to a referee, rather than going through the new review mechanism.

While these changes do not represent a major overhaul of the Federal Code, they do move in the right direction, in providing additional clarity and efficiency for employers subject to the Federal Code. The most significant change, the introduction of a limitation period for orders to pay wages, is an important and long overdue addition to the Federal Code, and is a welcome change for employers.

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(Not) April Fools Day – Changes to the Canada Labour Code effective April 1, 2014

New standards allow compassionate care leave for employees

Alberta’s Employment Standards Code, has been amended to provide new minimum standards to allow employees to take compassionate care leave. On February 1, 2014, these amendments will take effect.

Employees will be eligible to take up to 8 weeks of leave in order to provide care or support to a seriously ill family member if the employee is the primary caregiver. In order to qualify the family member must be:

  • a spouse or common law partner of the employee,
  • a child of the employee or a child of the employee’s spouse or common law partner,
  • a parent of the employee or a spouse or common law partner of the parent, and
  • any other person who is a member of a class of persons designated in the regulations for the purpose of this definition.

Currently there are no other persons designated in the regulations for the purpose of the above definition.

The employee’s employment is protected during this leave and no employer may terminate the employment of, or lay off, an employee who has started compassionate care leave.

In order for employees to take compassionate care leave they must meet the following requirements:

  • The employee must be employed for at least 52 consecutive weeks with the employer;
  • The employee must produce a physician’s certificate stating that the family member has a serious medical condition with a significant risk of death within 26 weeks and they require the care or support of one or more family members; and
  • The employee must be the “primary caregiver”, meaning that the employee has the primary responsibility for providing care or support to a seriously ill family member for that family.

Given these new requirements for compassionate care leave, we recommend that employers review their workplace policies to ensure compliance with the Employment Standards Code.

New standards allow compassionate care leave for employees

Compliance Reminder – Accessibilty for Ontarians with Disabilities Act

The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (“AODA”) has been around for a while.  So what’s the big deal now?

For starters, recent Freedom of Information Act requests have demonstrated that about 70% of Ontario private sector employers with 20 or more employees have not yet complied with required self-reporting requirements to demonstrate that they are compliant with the AODA.  Perhaps more importantly, most private sector employers with 20 or more employees don’t even realize that they have certain obligations under the AODA as of January 1, 2014.

While reference should be had to the legislation for particulars as to the imminent requirements, the following should serve as a high level overview of what needs to be done by certain employers.

1.  Public sector employers with 20 or more employees are to file a compliance report with the Ontario government by December 31, 2013, confirming that they are currently compliant with the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service.  The filing can be done online.

2.  By January 1, 2014, those same employers must also develop policies governing how they will meet their requirements under the Integrated Accessibility Standards.   In addition, a multi-year accessiblity plan must  be developed, posted on the organizations’ websites, and provided in an accessible format upon request.

3.  For employers with 50 or more employees in Ontario that are launching a new website or undertaking a significant website refresh after January 1, 2014, the website is required to conform to the World Wide Web Consortium Web Content Accessbility Guidelines 2.0 Level A unless an exception applies or the company can demonstrate that meeting the guidelines is not practical.

Because most Ontario businesses are not compliant with the AODA, the Ontario government has begun issuing notices of non-compliance and has indicated that it intends to pursue businesses which are non-responsive.

For further information, see the Ontario government’s website on AODA requirements: http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/en/mcss/programs/accessibility/

 

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Compliance Reminder – Accessibilty for Ontarians with Disabilities Act

The Non-Working Worker: A Practical Guide for Dealing with Employee Absences – Seminar

We hope that you will join us in Vancouver on Wednesday, November 20th as we discuss:

  • When They’re Not at Work: Managing Employees on Leave – Jeff Bastien
  • When They Don’t Return: Managing Employees who are Unwilling or Unable to Return – Andrea Raso
  • They’re Baaaaack…: Managing Reintegration and Performance Expectations – Dana Hooker

BC HRMA members – this workshop may be eligible for CHRP recertification credits.

Event Details
November 20, 2013
8:00 AM – 10:00 AM PDT

Terminal City Club
Walker Room
837 West Hastings St.
Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada

This session is complimentary. Please email vancouver.events@dentons.com to RSVP before November 15th.

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The Non-Working Worker: A Practical Guide for Dealing with Employee Absences – Seminar